Colonel William A. Phillips

Elijah Brigham (July 7, 1751 – February 22, 1816) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts.

Brigham was born in Westborough (now Northborough), Massachusetts, son of Colonel Levi Brigham and Susanna (Grout) Brigham. He was a descendant of Thomas Brigham and Edmund Rice, early immigrants to Massachusetts Bay Colony.[1] Brigham was graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1778. He studied law, but did not practice. He engaged in mercantile pursuits at Westborough. He served as member of the State house of representatives 1791–1793. He served as justice of the court of common pleas 1795–1811. He served in the State senate in 1796, 1798 from 1801 to 1805, and 1807–1810. He served as a state councilor in 1799, 1800, and 1806.

Brigham was elected as a Federalist to the Twelfth, Thirteenth, and Fourteenth Congresses and served from March 4, 1811, until his death in Washington, D.C., February 22, 1816. He was interred in the Congressional Cemetery.

Brigham was elected a member of the American Antiquarian Society in 1813.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Elijah Brigham (1751-1816)". Edmund Rice (1638) Association. Retrieved 13 May 2012.
  2. ^ American Antiquarian Society Members Directory

External links

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Joseph Allen
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 10th congressional district

1811–1815
Succeeded by
Laban Wheaton
Preceded by
Abijah Bigelow
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 11th congressional district

1815–1816
Succeeded by
Benjamin Adams