Colonel William A. Phillips

Kansas' 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Kansas that covers most of the eastern part of the state, except for the core of the Kansas City Metropolitan Area. The district encompasses less than a quarter of the state. The state capital of Topeka and the city of Lawrence, home of one of the state's universities, The University of Kansas, are both located within this district.

The district is currently represented by Republican Jake LaTurner.

History

Kansas had but one representative in the U.S. House of Representatives until after the 1870 U.S. Census, which showed that the state was entitled to three members of the lower branch of the national legislature. In 1872, three representatives-at-large were elected, but by the act of March 2, 1874, the legislature divided the state into three districts. The 2nd congressional district was composed of the counties of Montgomery, Wilson, Labette, Cherokee, Crawford, Neosho, Bourbon, Allen, Anderson, Linn, Miami, Franklin, Johnson, Douglas and Wyandotte.

No changes were made in until after the 1880 U.S. Census, which gave the state seven representatives. On March 5, 1883, Governor George Washington Glick approved an act of the legislature which reduced the 2nd congressional district to only include the counties of Wyandotte, Johnson, Douglas, Miami, Franklin, Anderson, Linn, Allen and Bourbon.

Although the 1890 U.S. Census showed the population of Kansas to be large enough to entitle the state to eight representatives, no additional district was created until 1905. By the act of March 9, 1905, the state was divided into eight districts with the 2nd Congressional district being composed of the counties of Wyandotte, Johnson, Douglas, Miami, Franklin, Anderson, Linn, Allen and Bourbon.[3]

Reapportionment for 2002 placed the western half of Lawrence as well as Miami County into the 2nd congressional district and cut out the counties of Geary, Montgomery and Nemaha.

Reapportionment in 2012 meant the 2nd congressional district included the entirety of Lawrence in the 2nd congressional district. The district's boundaries were altered to remove Manhattan, home of Kansas State University, and portions of Miami County while adding all of Montgomery County and Nemaha County and portions of Marshall County.

Demographics

Following redistricting after the 2000 U.S. Census,[4] there were 672,102 people, 257,856 households, and 173,309 families residing in the district. The population density was 47.6/mi2 over a land area of 14,133 square miles (36,600 km2). There were 280,213 housing units at an average density of 19.8/mi2. The racial makeup of the district is 89.01% White, 5.06% Black or African American, 1.26% Native American, 0.97% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.52% from other races, and 2.12% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.81% of the population.

There were 257,856 households, out of which 34.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.48% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.79% were non-families. 26.73% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.63% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the district the population distribution by age is 25.34% under the age of 18, 11.88% from 18 to 24, 27.54% from 25 to 44, 21.70% from 45 to 64, and 13.54% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.3 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.08 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.85 males.

The median income for a household in the district is $37,855, and the median income for a family was $47,095. Males had a median income of $32,033 versus $24,230 for females. The per capita income for the district was $18,595. About 7.1% of families and 11.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.0% of those under age 18 and 9.3% of those age 65 or over.

Among the population aged 16 years and older, 64.5% was in the civilian labor force and 1.9% were in the armed forces. Of the employed civilian workers, 20.6% were government workers and 7.5% were self-employed. Management, professional, and related occupations employed 32.3% of the work force and sales and office occupations employ 25.4%. Only 0.8% were employed in farming, fishing, and forestry occupations. The largest employment by industry was: educational, health and social services, 24.5%; manufacturing, 12.3%; and retail trade, 11.4%. Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining industries only employed 3.0%.

List of members representing the district

Member
(Residence)
Party Years in office Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1875
JRGoodin.jpg
John R. Goodin
(Humboldt)
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
44th Elected in 1874.
Lost re-election.
DCHaskell.jpg
Dudley C. Haskell
(Lawrence)
Republican March 4, 1877 –
December 16, 1883
45th
46th
47th
Elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
Died.
Vacant December 16, 1883 –
March 21, 1884
47th
Edward H. Funston.jpg
Edward H. Funston
(Iola)
Republican March 21, 1884 –
August 2, 1894
47th
48th
49th
50th
51st
52nd
53rd
Elected to finish Haskell's term.
Re-elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Re-elected in 1892.
Lost contested election.
Horace L. Moore.jpg
Horace L. Moore
(Lawrence)
Democratic August 2, 1894 –
March 3, 1895
53rd Won contested election.
Lost re-election.
Orrin Larrabee Miller.jpg
Orrin L. Miller
(Lawrence)
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
54th Elected in 1894.
Retired.
Mason S. Peters.jpg
Mason S. Peters
(Kansas City)
Populist March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1899
55th Elected in 1896.
Lost re-election.
Justin De Witt Bowersock (Kansas Congressman).jpg
Justin D. Bowersock
(Lawrence)
Republican March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1907
56th
57th
58th
59th
Elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Retired.
Charles F. Scott (Kansas Congressman).jpg
Charles F. Scott
(Iola)
Republican March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1911
60th Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Lost re-election.
Alexander C. Mitchell.jpg
Alexander C. Mitchell
(Lawrence)
Republican March 4, 1911 –
July 7, 1911
61st Elected in 1910.
Died.
Vacant July 7, 1911 –
November 7, 1911
61st
Joseph Taggart - Clara Barton Centenary.jpg
Joseph Taggart
(Kansas City)
Democratic November 7, 1911 –
March 3, 1917
61st
62nd
63rd
64th
Elected to finish Mitchell's term.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Lost re-election.
EdwardCLittle.jpg
Edward C. Little
(Kansas City)
Republican March 4, 1917 –
June 27, 1924
65th
66th
67th
68th
Elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Died.
Vacant June 27, 1924 –
November 4, 1924
68th
Ulysses S. Guyer.jpg
Ulysses S. Guyer
(Kansas City)
Republican November 4, 1924 –
March 3, 1925
Elected to finish Little's term.
Lost re-election.
Chauncey B. Little (Kansas Congressman).jpg
Chauncey B. Little
(Olathe)
Democratic March 4, 1925 –
March 3, 1927
69th Elected in 1924.
Lost re-election.
Ulysses S. Guyer.jpg
Ulysses S. Guyer
(Kansas City)
Republican March 4, 1927 –
June 5, 1943
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
Elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Died.
Vacant June 5, 1943 –
September 14, 1943
78th
Errett Scrivner.jpg
Errett P. Scrivner
(Kansas City)
Republican September 14, 1943 –
January 3, 1959
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
Elected to finish Guyer's term.
Elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Lost re-election.
Newell A. George (Kansas Congressman).jpg
Newell A. George
(Kansas City)
Democratic January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1961
86th Elected in 1958.
Lost re-election.
Robert F. Ellsworth.jpg
Robert F. Ellsworth
(Lawrence)
Republican January 3, 1961 –
January 3, 1963
87th Elected in 1960.
Redistricted to the 3rd district.
William Henry Avery.png
William H. Avery
(Wakefield)
Republican January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1965
88th Redistricted from the 1st district and re-elected in 1962.
Retired to run for Governor of Kansas.
Chester L. Mize.jpg
Chester L. Mize
(Atchison)
Republican January 3, 1965 –
January 3, 1971
89th
90th
91st
Elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Lost re-election.
William R. Roy.jpg
William Robert Roy
(Topeka)
Democratic January 3, 1971 –
January 3, 1975
92nd
93rd
Elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
Martha Keys.jpg
Martha Elizabeth Keys
(Manhattan)
Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1979
94th
95th
Elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Lost re-election.
Jim Jeffries (Kansas Congressman).jpg
James Edmund Jeffries
(Atchison)
Republican January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1983
96th
97th
Elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Retired.
Representative Jim Slattery.jpg
Jim Slattery
(Topeka)
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1995
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
Elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Retired to run for Governor of Kansas.
Early Senate Portrait of Sam Brownback.gif
Sam Brownback
(Topeka)
Republican January 3, 1995 –
November 7, 1996
104th Elected in 1994.
Resigned November 27, 1996 retroactive to November 7, 1996 when elected U.S. senator.
Vacant November 7, 1996 –
November 27, 1996
Jimryun.jpg
Jim Ryun
(Topeka, then Lawrence)
Republican November 27, 1996 –
January 3, 2007
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
Elected in 1996 and seated early under the provisions of K.S.A. 25-3503[d].[5]
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Lost re-election.
Nancy boyda.JPG
Nancy Boyda
(Topeka)
Democratic January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2009
110th Elected in 2006.
Lost re-election.
Lynn Jenkins, official portrait, 113th Congress.jpg
Lynn Jenkins
(Topeka)
Republican January 3, 2009 –
January 3, 2019
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
Elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Retired.
Steve Watkins official photo (cropped).jpg
Steve Watkins
(Topeka)
Republican January 3, 2019 –
January 3, 2021
116th Elected in 2018.
Lost renomination.
Jake LaTurner Congressional ID photo (117th).jpg
Jake LaTurner
(Topeka)
Republican January 3, 2021 –
Present
117th Elected in 2020.

Recent election results from statewide races

Year Office Results
2000 U.S. President George W. Bush (R) 54 – Al Gore (D) 41%
2004 U.S. President George W. Bush (R) 59 – John Kerry (D) 39%
2008 U.S. President John McCain (R) 55 – Barack Obama (D) 43%
2012 U.S. President Mitt Romney (R) 56 – Barack Obama (D) 42%
2016 U.S. President Donald Trump (R) 56 – Hillary Clinton (D) 37%
2020 U.S. President Donald Trump (R) 56 – Joe Biden (D) 42%

Recent election results

2002

Kansas's 2nd Congressional District Election (2002)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Ryun* 126,169 60.45
Democratic Dan Lykins 78,286 37.51
Libertarian Art Clack 4,263 2.04
Total votes 208,718 100.00
Republican hold

2004

Kansas's 2nd Congressional District Election (2004)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Ryun* 165,325 56.15
Democratic Nancy Boyda 121,532 41.28
Libertarian Dennis Hawver 7,579 2.57
Total votes 294,436 100.00
Republican hold

2006

Kansas's 2nd Congressional District Election (2006)
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nancy Boyda 111,759 50.60
Republican Jim Ryun* 104,128 47.15
Reform Roger Tucker 4,980 2.26
Total votes 220,867 100.00
Democratic gain from Republican

2008

Kansas's 2nd Congressional District Election (2008)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lynn Jenkins 155,532 50.61
Democratic Nancy Boyda* 142,013 46.21
Reform Leslie Martin 5,080 1.65
Libertarian Robert Garrard 4,683 1.52
Total votes 262,027 100.00
Republican gain from Democratic

2010

Kansas's 2nd Congressional District Election (2010)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lynn Jenkins* 130,034 63.13
Democratic Cheryl Hudspeth 66,588 32.33
Libertarian Robert Garrard 9,353 4.54
Total votes 205,975 100.00
Republican hold

2012

Kansas's 2nd Congressional District Election (2012)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lynn Jenkins* 167,463 57.0
Democratic Tobias Schlingensiepen 113,735 38.7
Libertarian Dennis Hawver 12,520 4.2
Total votes 293,718 100.00
Republican hold

2014

Kansas's 2nd Congressional District Election (2014)[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lynn Jenkins* 128,742 57.0
Democratic Margie Wakefield 87,153 38.6
Libertarian Christopher Clemmons 9,791 4.3
Total votes 225,686 99.9
Republican hold

2016

Kansas's 2nd Congressional District Election (2016) [7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lynn Jenkins* 181,228 60.9
Democratic Britani Potter 96,840 32.5
Libertarian James Houston Bales 19,333 6.5
Total votes 297,401 99.9
Republican hold

2018

Kansas's 2nd Congressional District Election (2018) [8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Watkins 126,099 47.6
Democratic Paul Davis 123,900 46.8
Libertarian Kelly Standley 21,386 7.2
Total votes 271,386 100
Republican hold

2020

Kansas's 2nd Congressional District Election (2020)[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jake LaTurner 185,464 55.2
Democratic Michelle De La Isla 136,650 40.6
Libertarian Robert Garrard 14,201 4.2
Total votes 336,315 100.0
Republican hold

Historical district boundaries

2003 – 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=20&cd=02
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ Frank W. Blackmar, ed. (1912). "Congressional Districts". Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc ... I. Chicago: Standard Pub Co. pp. 400–401. Archived from the original on 2006-10-10. Retrieved 2006-11-16.
  4. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ "K.S.A. 25-3503[d]". Retrieved February 3, 2019.
  6. ^ http://www.sos.ks.gov/elections/14elec/2014%20General%20Election%20Official%20Results.pdf
  7. ^ https://www.sos.ks.gov/elections/16elec/2016_General_Election_Official_Results.pdf
  8. ^ https://www.sos.ks.gov/elections/16elec/2018_General_Election_Official_Results.pdf
  9. ^ "2020 General Election - Official Vote Totals" (PDF). Kansas Secretary of State. Retrieved December 2, 2020.

Coordinates: 38°36′N 95°18′W / 38.6°N 95.3°W / 38.6; -95.3