Colonel William A. Phillips

Leverett Saltonstall (June 13, 1783 – May 8, 1845), was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Massachusetts who also served as Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, President of the Massachusetts Senate,[5] the first Mayor of Salem, Massachusetts[6] and a Member of the Board of Overseers of Harvard College.[7]

Saltonstall was a great-grandfather of Massachusetts Governor and U.S. Senator Leverett Saltonstall (1892-1979).

Early life and education

Saltonstall was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, June 13, 1783 as a member of the Saltonstall family. He pursued classical studies, attending Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, and was graduated from Harvard University in 1802. He studied law, and was admitted to the bar association and commenced practice in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1805.

Salem City Hall & Mayor Leverett Saltonstall

Salem City Hall was built in 1837-38 under the supervision of Mayor Leverett Saltonstall and a committee appointed for that purpose. The cornerstone was laid on September 6, 1837. Artifacts buried beneath the cornerstone included copies of local newspapers, the Mayor's speech for the organization of City Government (May 9, 1836), and the new City Charter.

Estate of Simon Forrester

Saltonstall, his brother-in-law Dudley Leavitt Pickman and Nathaniel Bowditch all acted as trustees of the estate of Simon Forrester, a ship captain born in Ireland who became one of pioneers of Salem merchant shipping and one of Salem's leading merchants and philanthropists.[8][9]

Positions and offices

Death and burial

Leverett Saltonstall died in Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, May 8, 1845, and rests in Harmony Grove Cemetery.

References

  1. ^ Hurd, Duane Hamilton (1888), History of Essex County, Massachusetts: with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, Volume I, Issue 1, Philadelphia, PA: J.W. Lewis & Co., p. 225.
  2. ^ Quincy, Josiah (1840), The history of Harvard University, Volume 1, Cambridge, MA: John Owen, p. 505.
  3. ^ Quincy, Josiah (1840), The history of Harvard University, Volume 1, Cambridge, MA: John Owen, p. 505.
  4. ^ Hurd, Duane Hamilton (1888), History of Essex County, Massachusetts: with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, Volume I, Issue 1, Philadelphia, PA: J.W. Lewis & Co., p. xxxvi.
  5. ^ New England Historic Genealogical Society (1908), Memorial biographies of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, Volume IX 1890-1897, Philadelphia, PA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, p. 254.
  6. ^ Hurd, Duane Hamilton (1888), History of Essex County, Massachusetts: with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, Volume 1, Issue 1, Philadelphia, PA: J.W. Lewis & Co., p. 225.
  7. ^ New England Historic Genealogical Society (1908), Memorial biographies of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, Volume IX 1890-1897, Philadelphia, PA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, p. 254.
  8. ^ Dudley Leavitt Pickman Papers, Phillips Library Collection, Peabody Essex Museum, pem.org Archived 2014-12-18 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ Simon Forrester, Historical Collections of the Essex Institute, Vol. IV, G.M. Whipple & A.A. Smith, Salem, 1862
  10. ^ "Book of Members, 1780–2010: Chapter S" (PDF). American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved September 9, 2016.

Bibliography

Political offices
Preceded by
President of the
Massachusetts Senate

1831 - 1832
Succeeded by
William Thorndike
Preceded by
Board of Selectmen
First Mayor of Salem, Massachusetts
1836 - 1838
Succeeded by
Stephen C. Phillips
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Stephen C. Phillips
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district

December 5, 1838 – March 3, 1843
Succeeded by
Daniel P. King