Portal:Arkansas

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Introduction

Flag of Arkansas.svg

Arkansas (/ˈɑːrkənsɔː/ AR-kən-saw) is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2017. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state’s diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Arkansas is the 29th largest by area and the 33rd most populous of the 50 United States. The capital and most populous city is Little Rock, located in the central portion of the state, a hub for transportation, business, culture, and government. The northwestern corner of the state, such as the Fayetteville–Springdale–Rogers Metropolitan Area and Fort Smith metropolitan area, is a population, education, and economic center. The largest city in the state’s eastern part is Jonesboro. The largest city in the state’s southeastern part is Pine Bluff.

Selected general articles

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The Boston Mountains is a Level III ecoregion designated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. states of Arkansas and Oklahoma. Part of the Ozark Mountains, the Boston Mountains are a deeply dissected plateau. The ecoregion is steeper than the adjacent to the north, and bordered on the south by the Arkansas Valley. The Oklahoma portion of the range is locally referred to as the Cookson Hills.

The Boston Mountains ecoregion has been subdivided into two Level IV ecoregions. Read more…

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Physical and human geographic features of Arkansas

The geography of Arkansas varies widely. The state is covered by mountains, river valleys, forests, lakes, and bayous in addition to the cities of Arkansas. Hot Springs National Park features bubbling springs of hot water, formerly sought across the country for their healing properties. Crowley’s Ridge is a geological anomaly rising above the surrounding lowlands of the Mississippi embayment.

The Buffalo National River, as it flows through The Ozarks to the White River, is a popular tourist attraction. It was designated the first national river in 1972 after years of conservation efforts in opposition to a United States Army Corps of Engineers plan to dam the river. The Arkansas River enters the state near Van Buren and flows southeast through Little Rock to empty into the Mississippi River near Arkansas Post. Most of the river serves barge traffic to Tulsa, Oklahoma as the McClellan–Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System. Through south Arkansas, the Ouachita River and the Saline River run roughly parallel to the Arkansas, and the major rivers in northeast Arkansas are the White River and St. Francis River. The Red River runs through the southwest corner of the state. Read more…

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Saline County Courthouse, located in the heart of downtown Benton.

Benton is a city in and the county seat of Saline County, Arkansas, United States and a suburb of Little Rock. It was established in 1837. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city had a population of 30,681. In 2017 the population was estimated at 35,789. It is part of the Little RockNorth Little RockConway Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city of Benton, first settled in 1833 and named after Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton, was formally chartered in 1836 when Arkansas became a state. Read more…

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Cross County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 17,870. The county seat is Wynne. Cross County is Arkansas’s 53rd county, formed on 15 November 1862 and named for Confederate Colonel David C. Cross, a political leader in the area. Read more…

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Map of Arkansas highlighting the Pine Bluff metropolitan area.

The Pine Bluff Metropolitan Statistical Area, as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is a three-county region in southeast Arkansas, anchored by the city of Pine Bluff. As of the 2010 census, the MSA had a population of 100,258. It is also a component of the larger Little Rock-North Little Rock, AR Combined Statistical Area which had 902,443 people in the census estimates of 2014. Read more…

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Historic downtown Rogers

Northwest Arkansas (NWA, officially designated by the United States Census Bureau as the Fayetteville–Springdale–Rogers Metropolitan Statistical Area) includes Fayetteville, Springdale, Rogers, and Bentonville, the third, fourth, eighth and tenth largest cities in Arkansas. These cities are located within Benton and Washington counties; NWA also includes Madison County in Arkansas and McDonald County, Missouri, according to the Census Bureau definition.

As per the 2016 United States Census Bureau estimates, NWA is the 105th largest metropolitan statistical area in the United States (525,032 residents) and the 22nd fastest growing in the US. The MSA covers 3,213.01 sq mi (8,322 km2), located within the Boston Mountains and Springfield Plateau subsets of The Ozarks. Read more…

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West Memphis is the largest city in Crittenden County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 26,245 at the 2010 census, ranking it as the state’s 18th largest city, behind Bella Vista. It is part of the Memphis metropolitan area, and is located directly across the Mississippi River from Memphis, Tennessee. Read more…

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Johnson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 25,540. The county seat is Clarksville. Johnson County is Arkansas’s 30th county, formed on November 16, 1833, from a portion of Pope County and named for Benjamin Johnson, a Territorial Judge. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county.

The Ada Mills Bridge links the Arkansas River between Johnson and Logan counties. It is named for Ada Mills, a former Republican political activist who lobbied for the structure for forty years before its completion. Read more…

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The National Historic Landmarks in Arkansas represent Arkansas’s history from the Louisiana Purchase through the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement. It contains the landmarks designated by the U.S. Federal Government for the U.S. state of Arkansas. There are 16 National Historic Landmarks (NHLs) in Arkansas. Another NHL was formerly listed in the state but was moved to Oakland, California.

This page includes a list of National Park Service-administered historic areas in Arkansas. Read more…

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Pulaski County is a county in the U.S. state of Arkansas with a population of 392,664, making it the most populous county in Arkansas. Its county seat is Little Rock, which is also Arkansas’s capital and largest city. Pulaski County is Arkansas’s fifth county, formed on December 15, 1818, alongside Clark and Hempstead Counties. The county is named for Casimir Pulaski, a Polish volunteer who saved George Washington‘s life during the American Revolutionary War.

Pulaski County is included in the Little Rock–North Little RockConway, AR Metropolitan Statistical Area which had 731,612 people in the 2015 census estimates. The Little Rock, North Little Rock Combined Statistical Area had 904,469 people in the 2015 census estimates. Read more…

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White County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 77,076. The county seat is Searcy. White County is Arkansas’s 31st county, formed on October 23, 1835, from portions of Independence, Jackson, and Pulaski counties and named for Hugh Lawson White, a Whig candidate for President of the United States. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county, though a few private establishments (such as the Searcy Country Club, and Veterans of Foreign Wars posts in Searcy and Beebe) can serve alcohol.

White County comprises the Searcy, AR Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Little RockNorth Little Rock, AR Combined Statistical Area. Read more…

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Crowley’s Ridge runs through the Mississippi embayment in this shaded-relief map.

Crowley’s Ridge (also Crowleys Ridge) is an unusual geological formation that rises 250 to 550 feet (170 m) above the alluvial plain of the Mississippi embayment in a 150-mile (240 km) line from southeastern Missouri to the Mississippi River near Helena, Arkansas. It is the most prominent feature in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain between Cape Girardeau, Missouri, and the Gulf of Mexico.

This narrow rolling hill region rising above the flat plain is the sixth, and smallest, natural division of the state of Arkansas. It is protected within Ozark–St. Francis National Forest. Read more…

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For editor resources and to collaborate with other editors on improving Wikipedia’s Arkansas-related articles, see WikiProject Arkansas.

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In the news

4 December 2018 –
Frank Scott Jr. is elected Mayor of Little Rock, Arkansas, defeating Baker Kurrus in the runoff. Scott will become the city’s first African-American mayor. (USA Today)
30 November 2018 – Tornadoes of 2018
A severe storm system brings tornado watches and warnings throughout the U.S. states of Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, and Missouri. A “large and dangerous” tornado is confirmed near Gore, Oklahoma. Several other tornadoes are seen by storm chasers. (4029 News)

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